sinidentidades:

“Immigration Is Beautiful” Mural Defaced With Racist Graffiti In Kansas

A group of high school students in Kansas came together with artist Armando Minjarez, the founder of an art and education non-profit, to identify issues that are important in their lives for a pilot program to create community-engaged art. Student after student wanted to make a piece on immigration.

“Some of them are immigrants, some are undocumented or have parents that are undocumented,” Minjarez, 27, and the founder of The Seed House La Casa de Semilla said. “One of the students designed the mural. I’m an artist by profession, so I guided them through the process. It was a really high quality mural for a group of 15- to 16-year-olds.”

“Immigration is beautiful,” the mural read.

But on Thursday morning a friend told Minjarez the mural had been defaced with racist graffiti and he quickly went to go see it. Scrawled in red, the word “welfare” was written in capital letters, along with “KKK” and “wetback,” a slur against immigrants (specifically Mexicans). 

Minjarez then began sharing images of the defaced mural with organizations, like Latino Rebels.

The growth of the Latin@ community in Wichita has been recent. Wichita schools have seen the percentage of Latin@ students double over the last decade, from 15% to 31%.

Besides the “immigration is beautiful” tagline, the mural featured a man and a woman with American and Mexican flags wrapped around them looking past a border fence towards the promise of the Statue of Liberty. Along the American flag are what look like DREAMers, undocumented youth brought to the country as children.

Minjarez says he and the students had spoken about how there could be pushback to this public display of their realities and he said the students are not discouraged.

“They’re not discouraged, but they’re certainly pissed off,” he said.

But Student Sarai Melendez, one of the students who painted the mural, said she was hurt, in a statement.

“All we wanted to do is bring a good message to this community; I feel upset and hurt, this was my biggest accomplishment,” she said. “We will make more and continue to express ourselves…this doesn’t stop us!”

Minjarez said the timing of the defacement of the mural coincides with the first meeting of Army of Artists, the complete group of artists who will decide and commit to the next pieces of public artwork. He said his internal goal is at least 8 more projects. “Whatever public art they want to create; a concert, a rap battle, an installation.”

He said this ugly episode will only invigorate the artists.

“We’re bringing to light the reality we live with everyday, we can choose to act like racism isn’t out there but it is.”


schrbk-deactivated20140307 asked:"hi, do you have some recommended reads/books on feminism/politics/immgration specific to the situation in the EU? I'm from Belgium myself"

redlightpolitics:

Rather than giving you a book or a list of books (though this one here would be a good one to read), I’d do something better, create a list of Euro folks who regularly comment on books, media and intellectual production.

Since you are in Belgium but I am unsure whether you prefer English, Flemish or French, then I’ll do the next best thing, direct you to people who cover all three languages!

Again, a couple of caveats: 

1. I am only including People of Color who are based in Europe in this list not because there isn’t any white person doing good work but because I want to center our voices in relating our experiences and multitude of differences as well as similarities. As I’ve said many times, I am very interested in “a choral, shared history” and I hope this list would reflect that. 

2. This is not a complete list and it is certainly not meant to encompass everyone doing awesome work. These suggestions are based on interactions I have through this space, Twitter and/or people I know personally. As I said yesterday on the Latina feminist reader, I am very happy to continue expanding this list with other suggestions. I am focusing this list on feminism of color/ womanism and migrant experiences only. I insist, this doesn’t mean there aren’t other people doing great work in Europe, offering political analysis or commentary. It’d be impossible to list them all so, instead, I am only centering the specifics of the question received: gender, politics and migration/ race.

For French feminism of color and awesome commentary, head to Ms. Dreydful’s blog. Also, if you are on Twitter, I strongly recommend you follow her.

For Flemish/ Dutch language, I would recommend Tamghrabit’s blog on this here Tumblr. She is also on Twitter and again, if you use the platform, I strongly recommend you follow her. Incidentally, she is the editor of Alert Magazine which publishes in both English and Flemish/Dutch. Link here.

Another Netherlands based Tumblr I would highly recommend is Queerintersectional. I won’t reveal anything about this person’s identity because I don’t know how comfortable they are with details of their lives being on the internet (a topic we actually never discussed) but suffice to say, I consider this person a dear friend and their politics are deep cutting, sharp and smart as hell.

Mieke’s blog here, Samblabelanda is a project to document her Indonesian heritage and family history within the Dutch colonial past. And a link to Twitter. It’s mostly in English but with a strong focus on Dutch history.

Sara Salem, who is Egyptian/Dutch blogs in English about colonialism, post colonialism, race and Marxism. Here’s a link to her Twitter where she is very active sharing news and commentary.

If you can read Dutch, head over to Roet in het Eten, Quinsy Gario’s blog for the eponymous radio show (which you can also listen to online, the team regularly posts soundcloud files, - they haven’t yet uploaded the show I was a guest at a few weeks ago when they do, I’ll share a link so that you can all listen to me raging in Dutch). Also, if you are on Twitter, follow Quinsy Gario there, he regularly shares info about events, shows, conferences, etc on his stream. Roet in het Eten is also a great place to read regularly because they post links to other blogs and media in the Dutch language.

For English language (British based), I strongly recommend the Black Feminists blog. If you are on Twitter, you can follow them here.

A must read, Sara Ahmed’s Feminist Killjoys blog. She is London based and one of the most prominent intellectual voices within European feminism. Her Twitter is also a must follow for those who use the platform.

Another favorite of mine is Reni Eddo-Lodge. Her blog can be found here. Again, she is very active (and awesome) on Twitter.

On this here Tumblr, “The “Right” kind of Brown” with commentary about race, disability and social justice from the UK. And a link to follow on Twitter.

Bonus Euro Women of Color on Twitter:

Judeinlondon, as her name suggests, London based. She shares links and commentary on current events and media and she always has sharp observations about culture and politics.

Ylva Habel, Stockholm based academic who shares her experiences and insights on issues pertaining to People of Color in Sweden.

Aniqah, a London based Queer WoC feminist Muslim journalist who regularly shares news and commentary.

Carol Roper, UK based, decoloniality, radical Black history, general awesomeness.


lightspeedsound:

sinidentidades:

Guillermo Campos-Ojeda says goodbye to his wife Adela and daughter Paloma before boarding a deportation flight chartered by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in 2010.

now please tell me about how deportation is the only way to preserve the american family
really
let me hear that argument again

lightspeedsound:

sinidentidades:

Guillermo Campos-Ojeda says goodbye to his wife Adela and daughter Paloma before boarding a deportation flight chartered by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in 2010.

now please tell me about how deportation is the only way to preserve the american family

really

let me hear that argument again


youngbadmanbrown:

White History Month, Day 2: Calvin Coolidge and American Homogenity:

On May 26, 1924, Calvin Coolidge signed into law the Immigration Act of 1924, a United States federal law that limited the annual number of immigrants who could be admitted from any country to 2% of the number of people from that country who were already living in the United States in 1890, down from the 3% cap set by the Immigration Restriction Act of 1921, according to the Census of 1890. 
The law was aimed at further restricting the Southern and Eastern Europeans, mainly Jews fleeing persecution in Poland and Russia, who were immigrating in large numbers starting in the 1890s, as well as prohibiting the immigration of Middle Easterners, East Asians and Asian Indians.
According to the U.S. Department of State Office of the Historian, “In all its parts, the most basic purpose of the 1924 Immigration Act was to preserve the ideal of American homogeneity.” Congressional opposition was minimal.

The 1924 Act also established the “consular control system” of immigration, which divided responsibility for immigration between the State Department and the Immigration and Naturalization Service. It mandated that no alien should be allowed to enter the United States without a valid immigration visa issued by an American consular officer abroad.
It provided that no alien ineligible to become a citizen could be admitted to the United States as an immigrant. This was aimed primarily at Japanese and Chinese aliens.
 Congressman Albert Johnson and Senator David Reedwere the two main architects. In the wake of intense lobbying, the Act passed with strong congressional support. 
Proponents of the Act sought to establish a distinct American identity by favoring native-born Americans over Southern and Eastern Europeans in order to “maintain the racial preponderance of the basic strain on our people and thereby to stabilize the ethnic composition of the population”. Reed told the Senate that earlier legislation “disregards entirely those of us who are interested in keeping American stock up to the highest standard – that is, the people who were born here”
Some of the law’s strongest supporters were influenced by Madison Grant and his 1916 book, The Passing of the Great Race. Grant was a eugenicist and an advocate of the racial hygiene theory. His data purported to show the superiority of the founding Northern European races. Most proponents of the law were rather concerned with upholding an ethnic status quo and avoiding competition with foreign workers.
The Act barred specific origins from the Asia–Pacific Triangle, which included Japan, China, the Philippines (then under U.S. control), Siam (Thailand), French Indochina (Laos, Vietnam, and Cambodia), Singapore (then a British colony), Korea, Dutch East Indies (Indonesia), Burma, India, Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and Malaya (mainland part of Malaysia). Based on the Naturalization Act of 1790, these immigrants, being non-white, were not eligible for naturalization, and the Act forbade further immigration of any persons ineligible to be naturalized. The Act set no limits on immigration from the Latin American countries
Source

youngbadmanbrown:

White History Month, Day 2: Calvin Coolidge and American Homogenity:

On May 26, 1924, Calvin Coolidge signed into law the Immigration Act of 1924, a United States federal law that limited the annual number of immigrants who could be admitted from any country to 2% of the number of people from that country who were already living in the United States in 1890, down from the 3% cap set by the Immigration Restriction Act of 1921, according to the Census of 1890

The law was aimed at further restricting the Southern and Eastern Europeansmainly Jews fleeing persecution in Poland and Russia, who were immigrating in large numbers starting in the 1890s, as well as prohibiting the immigration of Middle EasternersEast Asians and Asian Indians.

According to the U.S. Department of State Office of the Historian, “In all its parts, the most basic purpose of the 1924 Immigration Act was to preserve the ideal of American homogeneity.” Congressional opposition was minimal.

The 1924 Act also established the “consular control system” of immigration, which divided responsibility for immigration between the State Department and the Immigration and Naturalization Service. It mandated that no alien should be allowed to enter the United States without a valid immigration visa issued by an American consular officer abroad.

It provided that no alien ineligible to become a citizen could be admitted to the United States as an immigrant. This was aimed primarily at Japanese and Chinese aliens.

 Congressman Albert Johnson and Senator David Reedwere the two main architects. In the wake of intense lobbying, the Act passed with strong congressional support. 

Proponents of the Act sought to establish a distinct American identity by favoring native-born Americans over Southern and Eastern Europeans in order to “maintain the racial preponderance of the basic strain on our people and thereby to stabilize the ethnic composition of the population”. Reed told the Senate that earlier legislation “disregards entirely those of us who are interested in keeping American stock up to the highest standard – that is, the people who were born here”

Some of the law’s strongest supporters were influenced by Madison Grant and his 1916 book, The Passing of the Great Race. Grant was a eugenicist and an advocate of the racial hygiene theory. His data purported to show the superiority of the founding Northern European races. Most proponents of the law were rather concerned with upholding an ethnic status quo and avoiding competition with foreign workers.

The Act barred specific origins from the Asia–Pacific Triangle, which included JapanChina, the Philippines (then under U.S. control), Siam (Thailand), French Indochina (LaosVietnam, and Cambodia), Singapore (then a British colony), KoreaDutch East Indies (Indonesia), BurmaIndiaCeylon (Sri Lanka) and Malaya (mainland part of Malaysia). Based on the Naturalization Act of 1790, these immigrants, being non-white, were not eligible for naturalization, and the Act forbade further immigration of any persons ineligible to be naturalized. The Act set no limits on immigration from the Latin American countries

Source


prettywar:

baddominicana:

informate:

Whistleblowing Wednesday: Children As Young As Six Harvest 25 Percent of U.S. Crops
Knowing the farmer who grows your food has become an important tenet of the modern food movement, but precious little attention is paid to the people who actually pick the crops or “process” the chickens or fillet the fish. U Roberto Romano’s poignant film, The Harvest/La Cosecha (2011), being screened across the country for Farmworker Awareness Week (March 24-29), informs us that nearly 500,000 children as young as six harvest up to 25 percent of all crops in the United States.
What’s illegal in most countries is permitted here. Child migrant labor has been documented in the 48 contiguous states. Seasonal work originates in the southernmost states in late winter where it is warm and migrates north as the weather changes. Every few weeks as families move, children leave school and friends behind. If you’ve had onions (Texas), cucumbers (Ohio or Michigan), peppers (Tennessee), grapes (California), mushrooms (Pennsylvania), beets (Minnesota), or cherries (Washington), you’ve probably eaten food harvested by children.
This isn’t a slavery issue, or an immigration issue per se. What’s remarkable is that most of the migrant child farmworkers are American citizens trying to help their families. This is a poverty issue and it gets to the heart of what we, as consumers, see as the “right price” to pay for food. 
Children earn about $1,000 per year for working an average of 30 hours a week, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. When you consider that the average annual pay for a migrant family of four is $12,500-$14,500, it’s apparent why some families feel they have no choice but to bring their children into the fields with them. Half of these kids will not graduate from high school because they’re always moving around, perpetuating the cycle of poverty that caused them to be day laborers in the first place.
Read More

wut, vegans? wut?

“Poor people just don’t work hard enough!”

prettywar:

baddominicana:

informate:

Whistleblowing Wednesday: Children As Young As Six Harvest 25 Percent of U.S. Crops

Knowing the farmer who grows your food has become an important tenet of the modern food movement, but precious little attention is paid to the people who actually pick the crops or “process” the chickens or fillet the fish. U Roberto Romano’s poignant film, The Harvest/La Cosecha (2011), being screened across the country for Farmworker Awareness Week (March 24-29), informs us that nearly 500,000 children as young as six harvest up to 25 percent of all crops in the United States.

What’s illegal in most countries is permitted here. Child migrant labor has been documented in the 48 contiguous states. Seasonal work originates in the southernmost states in late winter where it is warm and migrates north as the weather changes. Every few weeks as families move, children leave school and friends behind. If you’ve had onions (Texas), cucumbers (Ohio or Michigan), peppers (Tennessee), grapes (California), mushrooms (Pennsylvania), beets (Minnesota), or cherries (Washington), you’ve probably eaten food harvested by children.

This isn’t a slavery issue, or an immigration issue per se. What’s remarkable is that most of the migrant child farmworkers are American citizens trying to help their families. This is a poverty issue and it gets to the heart of what we, as consumers, see as the “right price” to pay for food.

Children earn about $1,000 per year for working an average of 30 hours a week, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. When you consider that the average annual pay for a migrant family of four is $12,500-$14,500, it’s apparent why some families feel they have no choice but to bring their children into the fields with them. Half of these kids will not graduate from high school because they’re always moving around, perpetuating the cycle of poverty that caused them to be day laborers in the first place.

Read More

wut, vegans? wut?

“Poor people just don’t work hard enough!”


Why is Arizona so awful?

Arizona Republicans Fighting to Revive Arizona ‘Birther’ Bill

Arizona Birth Control Bill: An Arizona bill that could force some women to submit personal medical information to their employers about their non-contraceptive use of birth control would also require those women to pay a processing fee for the privilege.

Arizona State Rep Terri Proud thinks people should be forced to watch an abortion before they can get one

Arizona passes a bill to protect MDs from malpractice suits due to lying to and concealing information from pregnant patients

Arizona will now require a drug test for anyone seeking unemployment benefits

Arizona House repeals “Gun-free School Zone” laws

Arizona schools are eliminating Mexican-American studies departments and courses

Arizona bans ethnic studies for all K-12 students

Arizona Republicans push to REDUCE the minimum wage for minors

You can buy T-shirts of Arizona Governor Jan Brewer wagging her finger at President Obama

Arizona state lawmaker proposes a holiday for white people. For real.

Arizona courts bar candidates from running for city council if they can’t pass an English proficiency test

That’s all just within the last month or so! I didn’t even get to Arizona’s legendarily terrible anti-immigration law!

What the fuck is wrong with you, Arizona?

(For real though. Were they always this terrible? What happened?)


Top 10 Immigration Myths and Facts

leftist-linguaphile:

welcomingrhodeisland:

  1. MYTH - Immigrants don’t pay taxes
    All immigrants pay taxes, whether income, property, sales, or other. As far as income tax payments go, sources vary in their accounts, but a range of studies find that immigrants pay between $90 and $140 billion a year in federal, state, and local taxes. Even undocumented immigrants pay income taxes, as evidenced by the Social Security Administration’s “suspense file” (taxes that cannot be matched to workers’ names and social security numbers), which grew $20 billion between 1990 and 1998.
    National Academy of Sciences, Cato Institute, Urban Institute, Social Security Administration

  2. MYTH - Immigrants come here to take welfare
    Immigrants come to work and reunite with family members. Immigrant labor force participation is consistently higher than native-born, and immigrant workers make up a larger share of the U.S. labor force (12.4%) than they do the U.S. population (11.5%). Moreover, the ratio between immigrant use of public benefits and the amount of taxes they pay is consistently favorable to the U.S., unless the “study” was undertaken by an anti-immigrant group. In one estimate, immigrants earn about $240 billion a year, pay about $90 billion a year in taxes, and use about $5 billion in public benefits. In another cut of the data, immigrant tax payments total $20 to $30 billion more than the amount of government services they use.
    American Immigration Lawyers Association, Urban Institute

  3. MYTH - Immigrants send all their money back to their home countries
    In addition to the consumer spending of immigrant households, immigrants and their businesses contribute $162 billion in tax revenue to U.S. federal, state, and local governments. While it is true that immigrants remit billions of dollars a year to their home countries, this is one of the most targeted and effective forms of direct foreign investment.
    Cato Institute, Inter-American Development Bank

  4. MYTH - Immigrants take jobs and opportunity away from Americans
    The largest wave of immigration to the U.S. since the early 1900s coincided with our lowest national unemployment rate and fastest economic growth. Immigrant entrepreneurs create jobs for U.S. and foreign workers, and foreign-born students allow many U.S. graduate programs to keep their doors open. While there has been no comprehensive study done of immigrant-owned businesses, we have countless examples: in Silicon Valley, companies begun by Chinese and Indian immigrants generated more than $19.5 billion in sales and nearly 73,000 jobs in 2000.
    Brookings Institution

  5. MYTH - Immigrants are a drain on the U.S. economy
    During the 1990s, half of all new workers were foreign-born, filling gaps left by native-born workers in both the high- and low-skill ends of the spectrum. Immigrants fill jobs in key sectors, start their own businesses, and contribute to a thriving economy. The net benefit of immigration to the U.S. is nearly $10 billion annually. As Alan Greenspan points out, 70% of immigrants arrive in prime working age. That means we haven’t spent a penny on their education, yet they are transplanted into our workforce and will contribute $500 billion toward our social security system over the next 20 years.
    National Academy of Sciences, Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University, Federal Reserve

  6. MYTH  - Immigrants don’t want to learn English or become Americans
    Within ten years of arrival, more than 75% of immigrants speak English well; moreover, demand for English classes at the adult level far exceeds supply. Greater than 33% of immigrants are naturalized citizens; given increased immigration in the 1990s, this figure will rise as more legal permanent residents become eligible for naturalization in the coming years.              U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services)

  7. MYTH - Today’s immigrants are different than those of 100 years ago
    The percentage of the U.S. population that is foreign-born now stands at 11.5%; in the early 20th century it was approximately 15%. Similar to accusations about today’s immigrants, those of 100 years ago initially often settled in mono-ethnic neighborhoods, spoke their native languages, and built up newspapers and businesses that catered to their fellow émigrés. They also experienced the same types of discrimination that today’s immigrants face, and integrated within American culture at a similar rate. If we view history objectively, we remember that every new wave of immigrants has been met with suspicion and doubt and yet, ultimately, every past wave of immigrants has been vindicated and saluted.
    U.S. Census Bureau

  8. MYTH - Most immigrants cross the border illegally
    Around 75% have legal permanent (immigrant) visas; of the 25% that are undocumented, 40% overstayed temporary (nonimmigrant) visas.
    INS Statistical Yearbook

  9. MYTH - Weak U.S. border enforcement has lead to high undocumented immigration
    From 1986 to 1998, the Border Patrol’s budget increased sixfold and the number of agents stationed on our southwest border doubled to 8,500. The Border Patrol also toughened its enforcement strategy, heavily fortifying typical urban entry points and pushing migrants into dangerous desert areas, in hopes of deterring crossings. Instead, the undocumented immigrant population doubled in that timeframe, to 8 million— despite the legalization of nearly 3 million immigrants after the enactment of the Immigration Reform and Control Act in 1986. Insufficient legal avenues for immigrants to enter the U.S., compared with the number of jobs available to them, have created this current conundrum.
    Cato Institute

  10. MYTH - The war on terrorism can be won through immigration restrictions
    No security expert since September 11th, 2001 has said that restrictive immigration measures would have prevented the terrorist attacks—instead, they key is good use of good intelligence. Most of the 9/11 hijackers were here on legal visas. Since 9/11, the myriad of measures targeting immigrants in the name of national security have netted no terrorism prosecutions. In fact, several of these measures could have the opposite effect and actually make us less safe, as targeted communities of immigrants are afraid to come forward with information.
    Newspaper articles, various security experts, and think tanks

I want to print this and carry it around with me.




socialismartnature:

The U.S. immigration policy is so messed up and racist. Especially since Obama has authorized the dramatic increase in deportations by I.C.E. over the past three years, immigration authorities have been virtually sweeping through communities grabbing people left and right and quickly deporting them, without much purpose, planning, sense, or conscientiousness.

Such a mess …

====

 … Turner said with the help of Dallas Police, she found her granddaughter in the most unexpected place - Colombia.
 
Where she had mistakenly been deported by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in April of 2011.
 
 ”They didn’t do their work,” Turner said. “How do you deport a teenager and send her to Colombia without a passport, without anything?”
 
 News 8 learned that Jakadrien somehow ended up in Houston, where she was arrested by Houston police for theft. She gave Houston police a fake name. When police in Houston ran that name, it belonged to a 22-year-old illegal immigrant from Columbia, who had warrants for her arrest.
 
So ICE officials stepped in.
 
 News 8 has learned ICE took the girl’s fingerprints, but somehow didn’t confirm her identity and deported her to Colombia, where the Colombian government gave her a work card and released her.
 
 ”She talked about how they had her working in this big house cleaning all day, and how tired she was,” Turner said.

 … There are still many unanswered questions about how an African-American girl who speaks no Spanish is mistaken for a foreign national. Immigration officials are investigating and released a statement late Tuesday.


madamethursday:

[Image: A sign taped to a door that reads: “Attention all water customers: To be compliant with new laws concerning immigration you must have an Alabama Driver’s license or an Alabama picture ID card on file at the office before September 29, 2011 or you may lose water service. Thank you.”]
cupcakesnotbombs:

midwestmountainmama:

blackamazon:

hermanaresist:

strugglingtobeheard:

vikkiage:

stfuconservatives:

pantslessprogressive:

“There are people calling this a form of ethnic cleansing and I can’t figure out a reason why it isn’t. Sure, not every Hispanic in the state is undocumented, but you could certainly forgive them for feeling that measures this punitive mean they aren’t welcome. If the state is willing to deny someone water because they don’t have proper ID, they really, really don’t want you around.” - digby, on Alabama’s strict immigration law, which went into effect last week.

Wow. Ethnic cleansing by municipal pettiness. A new low.

THIS IS SO FUCKED UPPP

This is some really scary stuff.

this makes me cry. It feels like we’re heading to a climax of something in the near future.

WATER!!
WATER.
If they are paying the bill ( which to have  a bill for water makes me angry but whatever right now) what business is it of yours,
Oh wait you can immigrant blame until they are all gone and by that time people are so poor and downtrodden by the government not doing their jobs tehy have lost any fight to notice what’s happpened
except terrorizing and alienating INNOCENT HUMAN BEINGS

if ever there was better proof that white supremacist heteropatriarchy/nationalism is about resource distribution and the normalization of unequal distribution. and frankly, I’m SO tired of hearing, “stupid individual state who is making things sucky” crap. the entire US needs to take responsibility for this. Citizens need to ask themselves what their values are. is denying people *water* based on their ability to pay or their citizenship status ok??? is denying people water based on ANY reason ever ok? Because once we agree it’s ok based on people’s ability to pay—then it becomes ok to deny based on citizenship status, on the needs of corporations, etc etc.
this is not just about a state fucking everything to hell but ALSO about the normalization of restriction of resources to an ever increasing amount of people and the control of access to a *life source* by corporations/government rather than communities…

every single thing midwestmountainmama said

madamethursday:

[Image: A sign taped to a door that reads: “Attention all water customers: To be compliant with new laws concerning immigration you must have an Alabama Driver’s license or an Alabama picture ID card on file at the office before September 29, 2011 or you may lose water service. Thank you.”]

cupcakesnotbombs:

midwestmountainmama:

blackamazon:

hermanaresist:

strugglingtobeheard:

vikkiage:

stfuconservatives:

pantslessprogressive:

“There are people calling this a form of ethnic cleansing and I can’t figure out a reason why it isn’t. Sure, not every Hispanic in the state is undocumented, but you could certainly forgive them for feeling that measures this punitive mean they aren’t welcome. If the state is willing to deny someone water because they don’t have proper ID, they really, really don’t want you around.” - digby, on Alabama’s strict immigration law, which went into effect last week.

Wow. Ethnic cleansing by municipal pettiness. A new low.

THIS IS SO FUCKED UPPP

This is some really scary stuff.

this makes me cry. It feels like we’re heading to a climax of something in the near future.

WATER!!

WATER.

If they are paying the bill ( which to have  a bill for water makes me angry but whatever right now) what business is it of yours,

Oh wait you can immigrant blame until they are all gone and by that time people are so poor and downtrodden by the government not doing their jobs tehy have lost any fight to notice what’s happpened

except terrorizing and alienating INNOCENT HUMAN BEINGS

if ever there was better proof that white supremacist heteropatriarchy/nationalism is about resource distribution and the normalization of unequal distribution. and frankly, I’m SO tired of hearing, “stupid individual state who is making things sucky” crap. the entire US needs to take responsibility for this. Citizens need to ask themselves what their values are. is denying people *water* based on their ability to pay or their citizenship status ok??? is denying people water based on ANY reason ever ok? Because once we agree it’s ok based on people’s ability to pay—then it becomes ok to deny based on citizenship status, on the needs of corporations, etc etc.

this is not just about a state fucking everything to hell but ALSO about the normalization of restriction of resources to an ever increasing amount of people and the control of access to a *life source* by corporations/government rather than communities…

every single thing midwestmountainmama said


redlightpolitics:

I am a Non Western, South American immigrant in a society that is increasingly determined to get rid of those like me. Media constantly reminds me that we are practically non human. That our rights should be eroded further in the name of safety. Politicians build careers using the rhetoric of hatred against those like me. I was punched in the face, I was elbowed in the stomach on two different occasions by two White Supremacists who objected to my looks and my speaking another language with a friend. Racial slurs were hurled. And still, I know I don’t have it as bad as others. In the grand scheme of things, my life is privileged. I am a documented resident. At least, I am not one of the thousands currently in detention camps awaiting deportation. Then my life would be under the control of a corporation that actually makes a profit out off the lives of those who are dehumanized the most.

Out of everything I’ve written in the past year, this one piece is probably the one I am the proudest. Not because it is particularly well written (I wouldn’t make such claim), but because I have spent days researching the subject. I have come across so, so many documented abuses across different continents, different countries, seemingly disparate environments. However, all of them had one thing in common: they were perpetrated by the one corporation who profits from the business of undocumented immigrants. In fact, I found so many that I was forced to edit most of them out. What ended up in this piece is just the tip of one dehumanizing, terrifying iceberg.

And this, all of this, is supposedly done in the name of our safety.

go read this


iyjl:

“On Tuesday September 27th we are collaborating with the Chicago LGBTQ Immigrant Rights Coalition to present a community forum on the intersection between immigrant rights and the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) communities. Using the event as an excuse, here is a short list of these intersections put together by the Association of Latino Men for Action’s LGBT Immigrant Rights Project coordinator and IYJL organizer Tania Unzueta. Find more info here, or watch the live broadcast.”

7 simple reasons why the LGBTQ community needs to care about immigrant rights:

#1. We are immigrants too: Of the 10.8 million people who live in the United States undocumented, many are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ). Some of these are LGBTQ youth who came with their families as minors and consider the U.S. their home, while others came to escape persecution in their own countries. They have built their lives here, fallen in love, and started families, but under current U.S. immigration law there is no legal process for them to become citizens. Today they remain in the country in limbo, vulnerable to abuse, and under constant threat of being deported.

#2. Our families have limited options: LGBTQ immigrants, both documented and undocumented, face hurdles when attempting to regularize their status or become citizens. If an immigrant with a visa happens to fall in love with a U.S. citizen of the same sex, their partner cannot help them change their immigration status to that of a permanent residentv. Because same-sex relationships are not recognized under the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), for an immigrant who is in a same-sex marriage, there are an extra 2 years of residency before citizenship if the application is accepted compared to one who is in a heterosexual marriage. But if the application is denied, the immigrant partner will be put in deportation proceedings. There are at least 35,000 same-sex couples in the U.S. that are affected by the immigration system.

#3. We can’t help our immigrant partners: If a person is in deportation proceedings, whether it is because they traveled undocumented or were denied adjustment of status, there are very few options for them to remain in the country – heterosexual or LGBTQ. Some get a “cancelation of removal” from immigration when they have family members- children, husbands or wives, except that for same-sex couples, their citizen spouses do not count. As of May 2011 the policy of the Obama administration has explicitly been to deport immigrant same-sex partners of U.S. citizens, regardless of marital status. This year the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has estimated that they will deport over 400,000 people, the most annual deportations in the country’s history. According to statistics by DHS a third of immigrants detained have no criminal record, many of them include LGBTQ people, and permanent partners of U.S. citizens. [NOTE: This may change under the recent change in enforcement priorities announced by the Obama administration, and the guidelines for prosecutorial discretion announced by DHS. These procedures include LGBT people and same-sex couples, according to the White House, however there are still many questions about the implementation and efficacy of the policy].

#4. We are here escaping persecution: Many LGBTQ and HIV positive immigrants leave their country of birth escaping homophobic and transphobic violence, including threats to their lives. Since 1994 the U.S. considers this ground to request asylum and eventually permanent residency. However, the process for asylum can be a long and harsh process, where in the end, there is no guarantee that it will be granted. There are several cases of gay and transgender immigrants, who could not meet the burden of proof for their asylum claim. Some of them have accused immigration judges and officials of holding biased standards based on stereotypes of safety and behavior, and are still in limbo, or detained.

#5. We face harassment & death in detention: A civil complaint by the National Immigrant Justice Center against DHS details “sexual assault, denials of medical care, arbitrary confinement, and sever harassment and discrimination” against LGBTQ immigrants. The complaint is on behalf of 13 transgender and gay people who came to the U.S. to escape persecution in their won countries. In addition, there have been several documented cases where transgender immigrants have been denied access to hormones, and HIV+ detainees denied access to medication, resulting in a number of deaths and investigations into human rights abuses. These abuses reflect the wrongful treatment that thousands of immigrants face in detention facilities throughout the country, under a system that disproportionately affects LGBTQ immigrants.

#6. Queer undocumented youth are fierce: LGBTQ undocumented organizers have taken leadership roles in the national campaign for immigrant rights. This has been most visible in the campaign for the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act (DREAM), which would provide a conditional path to citizenship for immigrant youth who arrived to the country before the age of 16. LGBTQ youth have “come out” to speak about being LGBTQ and undocumented, using their stories to advocate for change.xiv Additionally some of these youth make specific references to the gay liberation movement as inspiration, citing Harvey Milk’s activism in the 1980s. If these youth were to be deported, some would be going back go countries that they have never known, and that may not be accepting of their sexuality and gender. For many of these LGBTQ undocumented youth the only country they have known is the U.S. and they are fighting for their lives.

#7. Our struggles are intertwined: The same politicians and organizations that oppose the rights of undocumented immigrants oppose the rights of LGBTQ people. Data shows that we are more likely to encounter a person who favors both immigrant and LGBT rights, than someone who supports immigration, but opposes same-sex marriage. Homophobic politicians are likely to attempt to block immigration reform to prevent LGBTQ immigrants from gaining legal status through same-sex permanent partnerships. LGBTQ movements need to build strategic alliances with immigration movements to ensure equal rights for all.


champagnecandy:

drunkengenius:

motherjones:

shortformblog:

“America is a melting pot, not a salad bowl.” We’ll get back to you when we figure out what that means.

It means Dan Savage just struck GOLD. #TossedSalad

Maybe it’s just a regional thing, but that was a concept from my junior high Social Studies class in 1989, used to illustrate the idea that assimilation isn’t the purpose of immigration but that many different ingredients can co-exist without losing their individual identities.
1989 people. Santorum is trying to argue against decades-old statewide junior high school Social Studies criteria and suggest that imperfect assimilation with the majority white culture should disqualify one from the American experience. No one likes analingus jokes more than me, but for real-real, he just argued for the hegemony of White America and it wasn’t subtle.

Luckily, that bastard won’t be president.
Sadly, Rick Perry might.

I remember the salad bowl thing! Rather than melting everything down to identical sludge like the “melting pot” metaphor, it emphasized that individual ingredients make the salad better, and all the different parts contribute to the whole. It was in my textbooks circa early nineties, and probably this asshole has been seething about it ever since. 

champagnecandy:

drunkengenius:

motherjones:

shortformblog:

“America is a melting pot, not a salad bowl.” We’ll get back to you when we figure out what that means.

It means Dan Savage just struck GOLD. #TossedSalad

Maybe it’s just a regional thing, but that was a concept from my junior high Social Studies class in 1989, used to illustrate the idea that assimilation isn’t the purpose of immigration but that many different ingredients can co-exist without losing their individual identities.

1989 people. Santorum is trying to argue against decades-old statewide junior high school Social Studies criteria and suggest that imperfect assimilation with the majority white culture should disqualify one from the American experience. No one likes analingus jokes more than me, but for real-real, he just argued for the hegemony of White America and it wasn’t subtle.

Luckily, that bastard won’t be president.

Sadly, Rick Perry might.

I remember the salad bowl thing! Rather than melting everything down to identical sludge like the “melting pot” metaphor, it emphasized that individual ingredients make the salad better, and all the different parts contribute to the whole. It was in my textbooks circa early nineties, and probably this asshole has been seething about it ever since. 


nezua:

hsnews:

 
Hate Crimes Against Latinos Increase by Almost 47% in California

Attorney General Kamala D. Harris today announced that the number of reported hate crimes in California held steady in 2010. In 2010, there were 1,107 hate crime events reported statewide, and in 2009 the number of hate crimes reported statewide was 1,100.
“A crime that is motivated by hate is a crime against all people,” Attorney General Harris said. “We will monitor and prosecute these cases to the fullest extent of the law.”
Click for story

And some wonder why we got our back up.

nezua:

hsnews:

Hate Crimes Against Latinos Increase by Almost 47% in California

Attorney General Kamala D. Harris today announced that the number of reported hate crimes in California held steady in 2010. In 2010, there were 1,107 hate crime events reported statewide, and in 2009 the number of hate crimes reported statewide was 1,100.

“A crime that is motivated by hate is a crime against all people,” Attorney General Harris said. “We will monitor and prosecute these cases to the fullest extent of the law.”

Click for story

And some wonder why we got our back up.