bialogue-group:

Polish Journalist To Be Deported By the USA Due To His Bisexuality
Ivo Widlak is a Polish-born bisexual man who’s been in the US since 2001 and has been married to his bisexual wife Lale for 10 years. After getting angry about an article he had written about some corruption, someone in the Polish community of Chicago informed the office of Immigration that he was a homosexual and not really married to his wife. He and his wife very angrily deny this.
They are happy to explain over and over (and over and over and over) that it is true they are both openly bisexual. And that as bisexual people they fell in love and are have chosen to be happily and monogamously married. But still the Immigration people persist in saying they are gay and the marriage is a fake.
This truly seems to be a case of the law not understanding or respecting the reality of the bisexual orientation. If Ivo was in a same sex relationship, he would not be deported for the Obama administration has stated that foreigners who are same-sex partners of American citizens can be included under an Obama administration policy suspending deportations of some immigrants who pose no security risk. If Ivo was straight he would also be safe, but because he and his wife are both bisexual their marriage, love and ability to live in the US is threatened.
Read More Here 
Yet again — So much 4 all that “Heterosexual Privilege” that all bisexual have … hmmmm?
Things To Do:
HELP US GET THE WORD OUT - they have been trying to do this in Silence & Secret. So reblog, share, tweet and signal boost
Go to your GSA, your SAGA’s, your LGBT Centers, all the LGBTQ Groups you give your money and time too. Make sure they know about this. Show them the actual definitions of Bisexuality. Make sure they stop making snide jokes about how Bisexuals all have “Privilege” … about how we are all just “in the closet” … how we are binary and transphobic and all the other sly digs and daily erasure we suffer. Make them listen to us and see us and include us.
If you are in the USA please join the BiNet USA Group on Facebook where announcements are being made as they come in
If you are in Chicagoland please join on Facebook: Bisexual Queer Alliance Chicago + Chicago Bisexual Queer Meetup on Meetup: Chicago Bisexual / Queer Community
And watch this and the other Bisexual Blogs … we will Post more information as we get it.
Thank You All

bialogue-group:

Polish Journalist To Be Deported By the USA Due To His Bisexuality

Ivo Widlak is a Polish-born bisexual man who’s been in the US since 2001 and has been married to his bisexual wife Lale for 10 years. After getting angry about an article he had written about some corruption, someone in the Polish community of Chicago informed the office of Immigration that he was a homosexual and not really married to his wife. He and his wife very angrily deny this.

They are happy to explain over and over (and over and over and over) that it is true they are both openly bisexual. And that as bisexual people they fell in love and are have chosen to be happily and monogamously married. But still the Immigration people persist in saying they are gay and the marriage is a fake.

This truly seems to be a case of the law not understanding or respecting the reality of the bisexual orientation. If Ivo was in a same sex relationship, he would not be deported for the Obama administration has stated that foreigners who are same-sex partners of American citizens can be included under an Obama administration policy suspending deportations of some immigrants who pose no security risk. If Ivo was straight he would also be safe, but because he and his wife are both bisexual their marriage, love and ability to live in the US is threatened.

Read More Here


Yet again — So much 4 all that Heterosexual Privilege that all bisexual have … hmmmm?


Things To Do:

Thank You All

iyjl:

“On Tuesday September 27th we are collaborating with the Chicago LGBTQ Immigrant Rights Coalition to present a community forum on the intersection between immigrant rights and the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) communities. Using the event as an excuse, here is a short list of these intersections put together by the Association of Latino Men for Action’s LGBT Immigrant Rights Project coordinator and IYJL organizer Tania Unzueta. Find more info here, or watch the live broadcast.”

7 simple reasons why the LGBTQ community needs to care about immigrant rights:

#1. We are immigrants too: Of the 10.8 million people who live in the United States undocumented, many are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ). Some of these are LGBTQ youth who came with their families as minors and consider the U.S. their home, while others came to escape persecution in their own countries. They have built their lives here, fallen in love, and started families, but under current U.S. immigration law there is no legal process for them to become citizens. Today they remain in the country in limbo, vulnerable to abuse, and under constant threat of being deported.

#2. Our families have limited options: LGBTQ immigrants, both documented and undocumented, face hurdles when attempting to regularize their status or become citizens. If an immigrant with a visa happens to fall in love with a U.S. citizen of the same sex, their partner cannot help them change their immigration status to that of a permanent residentv. Because same-sex relationships are not recognized under the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), for an immigrant who is in a same-sex marriage, there are an extra 2 years of residency before citizenship if the application is accepted compared to one who is in a heterosexual marriage. But if the application is denied, the immigrant partner will be put in deportation proceedings. There are at least 35,000 same-sex couples in the U.S. that are affected by the immigration system.

#3. We can’t help our immigrant partners: If a person is in deportation proceedings, whether it is because they traveled undocumented or were denied adjustment of status, there are very few options for them to remain in the country – heterosexual or LGBTQ. Some get a “cancelation of removal” from immigration when they have family members- children, husbands or wives, except that for same-sex couples, their citizen spouses do not count. As of May 2011 the policy of the Obama administration has explicitly been to deport immigrant same-sex partners of U.S. citizens, regardless of marital status. This year the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has estimated that they will deport over 400,000 people, the most annual deportations in the country’s history. According to statistics by DHS a third of immigrants detained have no criminal record, many of them include LGBTQ people, and permanent partners of U.S. citizens. [NOTE: This may change under the recent change in enforcement priorities announced by the Obama administration, and the guidelines for prosecutorial discretion announced by DHS. These procedures include LGBT people and same-sex couples, according to the White House, however there are still many questions about the implementation and efficacy of the policy].

#4. We are here escaping persecution: Many LGBTQ and HIV positive immigrants leave their country of birth escaping homophobic and transphobic violence, including threats to their lives. Since 1994 the U.S. considers this ground to request asylum and eventually permanent residency. However, the process for asylum can be a long and harsh process, where in the end, there is no guarantee that it will be granted. There are several cases of gay and transgender immigrants, who could not meet the burden of proof for their asylum claim. Some of them have accused immigration judges and officials of holding biased standards based on stereotypes of safety and behavior, and are still in limbo, or detained.

#5. We face harassment & death in detention: A civil complaint by the National Immigrant Justice Center against DHS details “sexual assault, denials of medical care, arbitrary confinement, and sever harassment and discrimination” against LGBTQ immigrants. The complaint is on behalf of 13 transgender and gay people who came to the U.S. to escape persecution in their won countries. In addition, there have been several documented cases where transgender immigrants have been denied access to hormones, and HIV+ detainees denied access to medication, resulting in a number of deaths and investigations into human rights abuses. These abuses reflect the wrongful treatment that thousands of immigrants face in detention facilities throughout the country, under a system that disproportionately affects LGBTQ immigrants.

#6. Queer undocumented youth are fierce: LGBTQ undocumented organizers have taken leadership roles in the national campaign for immigrant rights. This has been most visible in the campaign for the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act (DREAM), which would provide a conditional path to citizenship for immigrant youth who arrived to the country before the age of 16. LGBTQ youth have “come out” to speak about being LGBTQ and undocumented, using their stories to advocate for change.xiv Additionally some of these youth make specific references to the gay liberation movement as inspiration, citing Harvey Milk’s activism in the 1980s. If these youth were to be deported, some would be going back go countries that they have never known, and that may not be accepting of their sexuality and gender. For many of these LGBTQ undocumented youth the only country they have known is the U.S. and they are fighting for their lives.

#7. Our struggles are intertwined: The same politicians and organizations that oppose the rights of undocumented immigrants oppose the rights of LGBTQ people. Data shows that we are more likely to encounter a person who favors both immigrant and LGBT rights, than someone who supports immigration, but opposes same-sex marriage. Homophobic politicians are likely to attempt to block immigration reform to prevent LGBTQ immigrants from gaining legal status through same-sex permanent partnerships. LGBTQ movements need to build strategic alliances with immigration movements to ensure equal rights for all.


lesbianoutlaw:

rising:

Lauper says in the press release, “In New York City, a very disproportionate number [up to 40 percent] of homeless youth identity as LGBT. Even more disturbing are reports that these young people often face discrimination and at times physical assault in some of the very places they have to go for help. Our primary goal is to provide a physically and emotionally safe and supportive environment that will empower our young residents to be the self-loving, happy and successful individuals they were meant to be.”

:’)

Support: you’re doin’ it right.

For real? That’s fantastic.


larosson:

cognitivedissonance:

It has rainbows and unicorns. Night = made

THIS.

larosson:

cognitivedissonance:

It has rainbows and unicorns. Night = made

THIS.


stoplgbtqahate:

justinspoliticalcorner:

Perhaps desperate that societal support for marriage equality and other LGBT issues continues to grow, anti-gay hate groups seem to be showing their true colors more and more, abandoning tame “protect our family values” talking points for flagrantly pro-bullying rants. MassResistance, in particular, is increasing its visibility, attacking Mitt Romney by painting him as pro-gay, partnering with the Family Research Council to smear GLSEN, and today inspiring fear in the American Family Association’s “news” outlet that the anti-bullying “It Gets Better” project might soon be used in schools. Oh dear!

The OneNewsNow “article” is merely a pedestal for MassResistance’s Brian Camenker to remind people of the group’s campaign against the “It Gets Better” project:

CAMENKER: The homosexual movement discovered in the early 1990s that they could use this tactic of claiming safety or anti-bullying or anti-suicide to do anything. They’ll scream and holler that if you don’t let them into the schools to give their program, then you favor kids killing themselves.

In addition to an archive of “Dan Savage’s sick and obscene attacks, writings, and statements,” MassResistance maintains a page designed to rebut the “It Gets Better” campaign as well as The Trevor Project, which provides suicide prevention resources for young people. Here are the four “big lies” MassResistance worries that these LGBT-affirming resources provide:

“LIE” #1: “You were born that way and can’t change.”
“LIE” #2: “It gets better.”
“LIE” #3: Suicide is caused by hate and intolerance.
“LIE” #4:  Promoting homosexuality as being normal and natural is good for troubled kids.

MassResistance would rather young people get the following messages:

1: Homosexuality is an “addiction,” and “the worldwide ex-gay movement has shown that people can heal and change if they desire.”

2: “It DOESN’T get better,” because “male homosexual behavior takes 20 years off one’s life” and “loneliness and depression are par for the course.”

3: The real reason gay (“gay”) teens contemplate suicide is “because they’re horrified at the disgusting things they’re doing to themselves.”

4: Promoting homosexuality is “psychological trauma” that harms kids “emotionally, psychologically, and certainly medically.”

H/T: ThinkProgress LGBT

This is horrible. Why can’t people just be respectful and agree to disagree?

I would love to go after these MassResistence people. They make me so angry. This is basically encouraging gay kids to kill themselves.


gaywrites:

Where does your preferred presidential candidate stand on gay rights? This handy chart will tell you. Mad impressive. Source.

gaywrites:

Where does your preferred presidential candidate stand on gay rights? This handy chart will tell you. Mad impressive. Source.


"We must make it clear that a platform of ‘I hate gay men and women’ is not a way to become president of the United States."
— Jimmy Carter, relevant now more than ever. (via gaywrites)


Citing the Defense of Marriage Act, the Obama administration denied immigration benefits to a married gay couple from San Francisco and ordered the expulsion of a man who is the primary caregiver to his AIDS-afflicted spouse.
Bradford Wells, a U.S. citizen, and Anthony John Makk, a citizen of Australia, were married seven years ago in Massachusetts. They have lived together 19 years, mostly in an apartment in the Castro district. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services denied Makk’s application to be considered for permanent residency as a spouse of an American citizen, citing the 1996 law that denies all federal benefits to same-sex couples.[…]
“I’m married just like any other married person in this country. At this point, the government can come in and take my husband and deport him. It’s infuriating. It’s upsetting. I have no power, no right to keep my husband in this country. I love this country, I live here, I pay taxes and I have no right to share my home with the person I married.”

This is why legalizing state-by-state is not good enough. We have laws on the books that specifically exclude gay couples from federal benefits no matter what the people in the states decide. 
DOMA needs to be repealed. 
Also our immigration laws are ridiculous. 

Citing the Defense of Marriage Act, the Obama administration denied immigration benefits to a married gay couple from San Francisco and ordered the expulsion of a man who is the primary caregiver to his AIDS-afflicted spouse.

Bradford Wells, a U.S. citizen, and Anthony John Makk, a citizen of Australia, were married seven years ago in Massachusetts. They have lived together 19 years, mostly in an apartment in the Castro district. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services denied Makk’s application to be considered for permanent residency as a spouse of an American citizen, citing the 1996 law that denies all federal benefits to same-sex couples.[…]

“I’m married just like any other married person in this country. At this point, the government can come in and take my husband and deport him. It’s infuriating. It’s upsetting. I have no power, no right to keep my husband in this country. I love this country, I live here, I pay taxes and I have no right to share my home with the person I married.”

This is why legalizing state-by-state is not good enough. We have laws on the books that specifically exclude gay couples from federal benefits no matter what the people in the states decide. 

DOMA needs to be repealed. 

Also our immigration laws are ridiculous.